Jul 22 2018

Wikinews interviews You-peng Wang of Taipei Electrical Commercial Association

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Sunday, November 11, 2007

Besides becoming a political stomping ground for the Pan-Green and Pan-Blue coalitions, there are other changes from past years of Taipei Audio Video Fair (TAVF). With those changes in mind, Wikinews reporter Rico Shen interviewed You-peng Wang, chairman of the Taipei Electrical Commercial Association (TECA), the main organizer of TAVF, about the 60th year anniversary of TECA and the changes to the show.

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Jul 22 2018

News briefs:June 8, 2010

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Wikinews Audio Briefs Credits
Produced By
Turtlestack
Recorded By
Turtlestack
Written By
Turtlestack
Listen To This Brief

Problems? See our media guide.

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Jul 22 2018

Do We Still Need Massage Therapists Now That Massage Chairs Are Around?

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By Marion Mccants

When people discovered the healing art of massage, there were no high-tech and advanced massage chairs yet. Human touch was the only way to provide massage to a certain individual who wants to rest and relax. Then after some time, some people were able to discover several massage techniques like reflexology, deep tissue massage, shiatsu and many more. These techniques actually originated in different countries and it is on the way the therapist applies pressure on the body that makes the techniques different from each other. Therapists were doing a great job because an increasing number of people realized that massage is really an effective way to reduce stress, tension, depression and more. Through massage, they can set their minds at peace and completely relax. Then different types of massage equipments, particularly massage chairs, came into the scene.

At first, these so-called massage equipments were only used to help the therapists perform their job even better. But due to rapid technology advancement, there are massage chairs available now that are able to perform some of the most popular massage techniques. Many people even prefer to use these chairs instead of going to spa and health clubs for massage. This is because if they purchase a chair, they can use it anytime they want in the comfort of their own home. So even if they do not have much time to spare, they can still enjoy the soothing and relaxing effect of massage. Some chairs even come with really fun features like an MP3 player that can make your relaxation more worthwhile.

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Because these chairs seem to be so good, is there still a need for a therapist or the massage job can be turned over to the chair? This is among the many questions that some people have in my mind because of the presence of sophisticated and advanced massage chairs. Do these chairs provide the same quality of massage that therapists do? Well, basically even with the presence of these chairs, therapists are still needed. There are still people who prefer to get massage from human than a machine. These chairs do not provide the same massage quality but it is close enough. Therapists undergo series of trainings that includes some breathing techniques and many more. This is definitely impossible with a chair. And of course, it has been said that the healing process of injuries is faster when the massage is done by a human because of the gentle manipulation of the tissue.

Therefore, the need for professional massage therapists was never eliminated even if there are so many types of high-tech massage equipments out there. But of course, the decision to whether purchase a massage chair or get a massage from a therapist solely depends on you. If you want something natural, then you can consider visiting a spa or you want a good alternative, then you can consider the chair. But of course, you should remember that no matter how advance an equipment is, there are still some things that only humans can do.

About the Author: Marion Mccants enjoys writing about

panasonic massage chair

and

robotic massage chairs

as well as related products.

Source:

isnare.com

Permanent Link:

isnare.com/?aid=835304&ca=Wellness%2C+Fitness+and+Diet

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Jul 16 2018

Sex, mental and physical exercise, fight dementia

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Friday, April 8, 2005Professor Perry Bartlett of University of Queensland‘s Brain Institute recommends sex, cryptic crosswords and a good run to stave off dementia.

The researcher, interviewed on Australian ABC radio today [1], said that with 52,000 Australians expected to be diagnosed with dementia by the end of the year, people wishing to ward off the degenerative disorder may benefit from activities which stimulate growth of new cells in the brain, accompanied by mental exercise to select for survival of the resulting crop of new cells.

“Quite prolonged exercise is very good to make new neurones,” said the Professor. “These new nerve cells are really quite vital to our ability to function in the higher brain functions, such as memory and learning. Most of them die. We now know that we can preserve some of them by giving direct stimuli.”

Professor Bartlett explained recent research findings, including those from collaborator Jeffrey D. Macklis [2] at Harvard in the US.

“There are a lot of hormones and changes in blood that go up and down after exercise, and so that may be a lead to some of the chemicals that can drive the production of nerve cells.

“One of the chemicals that seems to promote neurogenesis is prolactin, and prolactin levels are very high in pregnant females. Prolactin levels, by the way, also go up during sex as well. So one could think of a number of more entertaining activities than running in order to regulate the production of nerve cells.

“Perhaps doing something a little more inquisitive or intellectual might be good at selecting their survival. So perhaps one should run a long distance and do the cryptic crossword or something like that,” he said.

Professor Bartlett gave the same suggestions as being potentially helpful in depression, last year in an interview on the ABC Science Show. [3]

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Jul 16 2018

Pakistan: car rams into police truck killing at least seven, injuring 22 in Quetta

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Friday, October 20, 2017

On Wednesday, at least seven people were killed and 22 were injured in Quetta, Balochistan province, Pakistan, after a car rammed into a truck carrying policemen. Abdur Razzaq Cheema, a police chief, said five police officials died in the incident and eight were critically injured.

Speaking to Al Jazeera, police official Muhammed Akbar said the incident took place on Saryab road. Sanaullah Zehri, chief minister of Balochi province, said, “it was a sucide attacker who appeared in a car with 70 to 80kg of explosives”. Reuters reported Pakistani Taliban had claimed responsibility for the attack.

Another police official was killed in a different part of the city. Lashkar-e-Jhangvi claimed responsibility for shooting and killing that official. They also claimed to have installed a bomb on the roadside. Officials said two Pakistani soldiers were killed due to that explosion.

At least five were killed in in a gunfire incident in Quetta last week. Earlier this month, more than a dozen were killed at a Sufi shrine in Balochistan in an alleged suicide attack.

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Jul 16 2018

Gay Talese on the state of journalism, Iraq and his life

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Saturday, October 27, 2007

Gay Talese wants to go to Iraq. “It so happens there is someone that’s working on such a thing right now for me,” the 75-year-old legendary journalist and author told David Shankbone. “Even if I was on Al-Jazeera with a gun to my head, I wouldn’t be pleading with those bastards! I’d say, ‘Go ahead. Make my day.'”

Few reporters will ever reach the stature of Talese. His 1966 profile of Frank Sinatra, Frank Sinatra Has a Cold, was not only cited by The Economist as the greatest profile of Sinatra ever written, but is considered the greatest of any celebrity profile ever written. In the 70th anniversary issue of Esquire in October 2003, the editors declared the piece the “Best Story Esquire Ever Published.”

Talese helped create and define a new style of literary reporting called New Journalism. Talese himself told National Public Radio he rejects this label (“The term new journalism became very fashionable on college campuses in the 1970s and some of its practitioners tended to be a little loose with the facts. And that’s where I wanted to part company.”)

He is not bothered by the Bancrofts selling The Wall Street Journal—”It’s not like we should lament the passing of some noble dynasty!”—to Rupert Murdoch, but he is bothered by how the press supported and sold the Iraq War to the American people. “The press in Washington got us into this war as much as the people that are controlling it,” said Talese. “They took information that was second-hand information, and they went along with it.” He wants to see the Washington press corp disbanded and sent around the country to get back in touch with the people it covers; that the press should not be so focused on–and in bed with–the federal government.

Augusten Burroughs once said that writers are experience junkies, and Talese fits the bill. Talese–who has been married to Nan Talese (she edited James Frey‘s Million Little Piece) for fifty years–can be found at baseball games in Cuba or the gay bars of Beijing, wanting to see humanity in all its experience.

Below is Wikinews reporter David Shankbone’s interview with Gay Talese.

Contents

  • 1 On Gay Talese
  • 2 On a higher power and how he’d like to die
  • 3 On the media and Iraq
  • 4 On the Iraq War
  • 5 State of Journalism
  • 6 On travel to Cuba
  • 7 On Chinese gay bars
  • 8 On the literary canon
  • 9 Sources

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Jul 16 2018

Pennsylvania lost 41,000 jobs in February, a 13-year high

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Saturday, March 21, 2009

Pennsylvania lost 41,000 jobs in February, the largest one-month span of job loss in the state in more than 13 years. According to media reports, about 1 in every 140 Pennsylvania jobs were lost in February, marking the worst drop-off in a single month since January 1996.

Since the recession began, Pennsylvanians have lost more than 100,000 jobs, leaving the state with less jobs than it had in July 2005, according to state figures.

“It’s clearly beginning to hit Pennsylvania in a way that it hasn’t so far,” Mark Price, labor economist with the Harrisburg-based Keystone Research Center, told the Associated Press. “Hopefully this is a blip, but we’re going to definitely continue to lose jobs, hopefully not at this pace.”

Governor Ed Rendell announced the numbers Thursday, the same day he called on Philadelphia-based oil refiner Sunoco to reverse its plans to cut 750 jobs, or about 20 percent of the salaried workforce.

Rendell said Sunoco should rescind the cuts because last year, the company made US$776 million in profit.

“In fact, although 2008 earnings were below expectations in the first two quarters, earnings in the last two quarters of 2008 were robust, to say the least,” he said, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer.

Sunoco officials said the move was a necessary response to a downturn in its oil-refining and chemical manufacturing businesses.

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Jul 16 2018

Belgium stops telegram services

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Saturday, December 30, 2017

After 171 years of existence, telegram services were permanently stopped in Belgium as of yesterday. The service was launched in 1846, and about 9000 telegrams were sent across the country from January 2017 to November 2017.

On December 12, Belgian telecommunication company Proximus, who provided telegram services in the country, announced they “will definitively end [our] telegram service” on December 29. Jack Hamande, board member of the Belgian Institute for Postal Services and Telecommunications, said, “It is mainly 10 customers using the telegram in Belgium today […] in finance, judicial services and insurance”.

The first telegram line was laid from Belgium’s capital Brussels to Antwerp. Usage of telegram has decreased enormously over the decades. According to Proximus’s statistics, about 1.5 million telegrams were sent during the early 1980s, with many telegrams coming from Italy, but the number dropped to fifty thousand in the early 2010s. Sending a twenty-word message via telegram in Belgium would cost around €16 (about US$19). Hamande said, “Most of the current users of telegram will shift to registered mail […] we see no reason to force the company to maintain this service.”

Telegram is still functional in Italy. It was invented in Great Britain in the 1830s, but was stopped there in 1982. The United States stopped telegram services in 2006, and the last telegram in India was sent on July 14, 2013 which began in 1850. In the mid-1980s, about 600 thousand telegrams were sent across India each day.

“If you ask young people […] they don’t know what a telegram is”, Hamande said.

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Jul 15 2018

News briefs:July 30, 2010

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Wikinews Audio Briefs Credits
Produced By
Turtlestack
Recorded By
Turtlestack
Written By
Turtlestack
Listen To This Brief

Problems? See our media guide.

[edit]

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Jul 15 2018

Coalition ups ante on Australian school tax rebates

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Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Australian opposition leader Tony Abbott has pledged private school relief if the Liberal/National coalition wins the upcoming federal election. The pledge came in response to the Australian Labor Party leader, and current Prime Minister, Julia Gillard proposing a uniform and school equipment tax break expansion.

Abbott’s proposal includes an offer of tax rebates for sending a child to a private school. For students in primary school, prep to grade 6, the rebate will rise to $500 Australian a year per student and families will be then able to claim 50% rebate up to $1000.

“We are expanding the rebate so it can be claimed for school fees and also for other educational costs such as tuition and special educational costs for children with, for instance, dyslexia,” Abbott said at a press conference in Brisbane.

Before the election was called, Gillard had aimed to pledge $220 million over four years to expand the current tax breaks to cover refunds each worth $390 for primary school uniforms and $779 for high school uniforms, as well as refunds for other school equipment like texts books and computers.

“We all know that uniforms can be an expensive part of sending kids to school, but this change, along with the existing refund for textbooks and computers, will help families with that cost,” stated Gillard.

An opposition spokesperson claimed that the “obvious flaw in Labor’s policy is that it only applies to stationery, computer expenses and uniforms […] You know as a parent that you need help for a whole range of expenses. Extra teachers for children with dyslexia or the costs of doing music and all the other expenses like excursions and so forth.”

The expansion is expected to cost $760 million in total and one that Abbott claims needs to happen as “cost of living pressures tend to be greatest when your kids are at school”.

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